Viewing entries tagged
general training

The Meaning of 'Sport-Specific' Training in Tennis: And How a Player Should Train

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The Meaning of 'Sport-Specific' Training in Tennis: And How a Player Should Train

Many athletes have the following problem - they seek to improve their sport performance while doing an overly large amount of the their training in the weight room.

Tennis players, on the other hand, have the reverse problem. They spend way too much time on-court and their off-court training closely resembles (or mimics) what they’re already doing on the court.

Then there are coaches and players (even parents) that often seek ‘tennis-specific’ training. Depending on how you define it, ‘tennis-specific’ can mean a lot of different things.

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Is Off-Court Training Too 'Specific'? How General Movements Can Benefit Tennis Players

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Is Off-Court Training Too 'Specific'? How General Movements Can Benefit Tennis Players

Last week I presented in front of the BTV (Bavarian Tennis Verband) - it’s one of the biggest associations in Germany and many of the top junior tennis coaches were in attendance. The topic - how we can use off-court training strategies to accelerate on-court development. I had 3 young junior players helping me during the practical component - going through a series of jumps, bounds, throws, bodyweight exercises and so on. They were 12-13 years old and apparently, some of the best young talents in the country (I never met them previously and had never seen them play or train).

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Physical Development for Tennis Needs More General Training

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Physical Development for Tennis Needs More General Training

Last week I wrote about some key lessons I learned from a weightlifting coach. One of those key lessons was the importance of general training for athletes. Although general training is vital for any athlete, developing athletes may get the greatest benefit from this type of work. When I talk about general training, I am referring to non sport specific movements. For tennis players, this means movements that are non tennis related. John Kiely, sport scientist and elite coach, refers to general training, especially in the early years of development, as movement diversity. In this article, we’ll explore the current dogma in physical preparation for tennis, why early specialization is an almost must and the theory behind general training.

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